Establish your own working culture

The objective of this four-year programme is to prepare you to think big, and it equips you with a matrix you can apply on any scale, be it through an opera, a musical, musical theatre, a choreography, an exhibition, a performance, a lecture or any other medium.
Your training will impart an understanding of various interdisciplinary creative processes: How can you combine sound and music, or images and the human body, to the best effect? What’s the best way of managing and engaging with singers, musicians and conductors, or with dancers, mime artists and actors? What sort of impact can the location or the audience have on your material? How should you get the most of non-theatrical spaces? How should you go about directing for non-theatregoers?

You will learn how to establish your own working culture, and how to get your creative team to share ownership of your vision and core ideas so that they give their full creative input. You’ll learn to speak the language of designers, playwrights and actors, to inspire your team and take them along on your artistic journey so that what you make together truly represents your vision. You’ll motivate and manage without losing sight of the big picture.

Controversial and innovative

Our study programme is like a ‘theatre house’ where students from different disciplines and at different stages are learning together. The programme itself is designed to be flexible, so that it can be adapted to address what’s important to you and what the theatre world considers relevant, controversial or innovative. You will learn to work as part of a creative team that includes students from Scenography, Production and Stage Management and Design & Technology.

Learning to direct means learning how to translate a concept into a play; learning to keep sight of the big picture; and learning to work as part of a creative team of fellow student scenographers, producers and technicians. Your lighting designer, actors, costume designer, dramaturge or video artist will help you challenge and question your intuition.

You will learn to read the thought patterns of these other artists.And you will practise maintaining clarity in this collaborative environment, while always holding your focus on achieving the best results for your play.

This flexible programme will adapt to what the theatre world considers relevant, confronting or innovative. The curriculum will alternate working encounters in large and small theatres.

Sometimes you’ll be making theatre generated by your own artistic spirit; sometimes ideas will be generated collectively. But at all times, you will be learning how to use your position as a director to the best possible effect.

You need to develop your talent on as many fronts as possible, so you’ll be taught by a rich mix of celebrated theatre veterans and young theatre makers much nearer your own age.

If you want to direct, you need to learn how to appraise, understand and inspire the actor, and you’ll learn to identify and guide the actors’ talents. Your relationship with your actors is complex and reciprocal, and it demands sometimes elusive forms of language and communication. 

This interplay of interdependence and autonomy can be improved and enriched by experience, and that’s why the Theatre Directing programme works closely with teachers and students at the Toneelschool&Kleinkunstacademie (ATKA) and the Mime department at Amsterdam’s Theaterschool, Toneelschool Arnhem and the Toneelacademie in Maastricht.

If you want to become a notable theatre director, you will need a solid theoretical grounding. So as well as the practise-oriented modules, in theory classes you will engage with the world in which you live – or want to live – and with literature, theatre and art history, modern and classic theatre repertoire, and music history.

This entire section of the programme is dedicated to helping you build a firm foundation in the knowledge and experience you’ll need if you’re going to position yourself in practise and develop yourself independently. The programme also includes prevocational classes where you will develop a cultural entrepreneurship plan (COP) for your dream theatre production.

Your training will impart an understanding of various interdisciplinary creative processes: How can you combine sound and music, or images and the human body, to the best effect? What’s the best way of managing and engaging with singers, musicians and conductors, or with dancers, mime artists and actors? What sort of impact can the location or the audience have on your material? How should you get the most of non-theatrical spaces? How should you go about directing for non-theatregoers?

The small size of the study group allows for intensive guidance. There are regular individual and group talks with the students to evaluate work and help put it on course if necessary. This process involves the artistic director, teachers and mentors. 

You will learn how to establish your own working culture, and how to get your creative team to share ownership of your vision and core ideas so that they give their full creative input. You’ll learn to speak the language of designers, playwrights and actors, to inspire your team and take them along on your artistic journey so that what you make together truly represents your vision. You’ll motivate and manage without losing sight of the big picture.

The Theatre Directing Study Programme demands much of its students: a large personal commitment and motivation, independence and self efficacy.

Especially during the first two years, a considerable amount of  work is undertaken during evening hours in addition to compulsory education programmes. Students read scripts or attend  performances. Four or five active evenings per week is no exception.

The final year will be devoted entirely to developing, making and performing two graduation productions and to internships.

Accreditation and degree

The bachelor's programme in Theatre Directing is a track within the Bachelor Theatre. The quality of this programme has been positively assessed by the Accreditation Organisation of the Netherlands and Flanders (NVAO). This means that upon successful completion of the programme students will receive an accredited bachelor's degree in Theatre and the title Bachelor Theatre. Only accreditated degree programmes are listed in the Dutch central register of higher education programmes (CROHO).

More information on accreditation and degrees

scenefoto's Kane/Büchner

Share